Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

By Jeremy G. Carter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Empirical Findings on ILP
Adoption

This present study primarily utilizes quantitative analysis of crosssectional survey data. Results from these analyses will be reported and discussed within this section. The analyses in this section will include discussions of variable descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations of variables, as well as ordinary least squares and ordinal regression analysis to draw inferences from the data on the adoption of intelligence-led policing within state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in the United States.


DESCRIPTIVE AND BIVARIATE STATISTICS

Table 4 displays a summary of the distributions for variables included in the study. With respect to the intelligence-led policing adoption index, agencies responded on average to have more than half of the critical components of intelligence-led policing in place. More than half of the agencies (57%) self-reported that they have yet to adopt intelligence-led policing. Twenty-four percent of the agencies indicated they were currently in development, and 19% said they had adopted intelligence-led policing.

The distributions of the two dependent variables utilized in the present study require further discussion. The intelligence-led policing adoption index is not normally distributed; it is positively skewed. As a result, the natural log of this variable is used for the multivariate ordinary least squares models (Berk, 2004). Consistent with using a logged dependent variable, the outputs of these regressions to be conducted will present the exponentiated beta. On average, agencies self-reported being closer to not adopting intelligence-led policing given that the mean is closer to not adopting than adopting and of the continuum. Once again, given the limited response options for selfreported adoption, ordinal regression is employed for multivariate models.

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.