Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

By Jeremy G. Carter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Recommendations for ILP
Adoption

The current study has explored intelligence-led policing as an innovative philosophy in law enforcement agencies across the United States; its findings provide insights for scholars and practitioners alike. No one theoretical model exists to provide guidance for such a study. An overriding framework for the study is the concept of program fidelity, a construct which requires proof of successful replication while allowing necessary variance across different organizations for an appropriate organizational/environmental fit. While observing this aspect of adoption, salient factors attribute to a greater likelihood of successful adoption and can be identified and applied across organizations. The intent of this study has been to explore both the organizational and policing literatures to develop a theoretical framework that could identify such pivotal factors as they relate to the adoption of intelligence-led policing. Moreover, the current study employed case studies to provide strategic context for the findings. This final chapter applies the most significant of the exploratory findings to: 1) the employed theoretical framework; 2) the process of adopting intelligence-led policing; and, 3) future research needed for improvement in the ILP dissemination process. Limitations of the current study will follow to give it appropriate boundaries of certainty and uncertainty of conclusions drawn.


SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS

The current study developed one full organizational model to predict intelligence-led policing adoption. However, this one model was used to predict two types of adoption - one as an operationalized index measure and the other a self-reported measure. A preponderance of this current discussion will focus on the index measure of adoption inasmuch as it is a more theoretical and substantive representation of intelligence-led policing adoption. Unless otherwise specified, findings discussed here are in reference to the index measurement of adoption. At the outset it is important to note that each predictor variable, except

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.