A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950

By Sabina Donati | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This is a book about Italy, its citizens, foreigners and Others. It is a book on italianità and national membership that I have been fortunate to write as an Italian woman, born and bred in Italy, but also as a foreigner and resident alien abroad, having been living outside the Italian peninsula for more than twenty years. The gestation of this volume has therefore been shaped by a personal mix of academic experiences, migratory life and italianità at home and abroad.

The research, writing and publication of this work would not have been possible without the generous financial support of several institutions, providing me with academic subsidies, research grants and fellowships. I am most grateful to the Fonds National Suisse de la Recherche Scientifique for its aid to publication as well as for a chercheurs débutants grant that allowed me to spend one full year in the Italian historical archives. I also wish to express my thanks to the Maison de l’Histoire of the Université de Genève for its funding toward production and publication costs; and to acknowledge my appreciation to the Tokyo Foundation and to the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, for their annual fellowships and grants.

As a long and rewarding journey this project has benefited from the insightful advice, thought-provoking comments and continuous encouragement of many people. My greatest debts of gratitude go to Andre Liebich (Graduate Institute), whose profound knowledge and generously sharp insights provoked me to refect on many interrelated historical aspects of citizenship and national identity from the very early stages of this work; I cannot find words to thank him for his devoted intellectual presence. I am also most thankful to Peter Sahlins (University of California, Berkeley) for his useful critiques and remarks on how to rethink the citizenshipnationhood nexus and for sharing his expertise on legal-jurisprudential histories of citizenship; as well as to Bruno Arcidiacono (Graduate Institute) for his early advice to incorporate European comparisons into my research. The work has also grown along the way and progressed a great

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.