Adaptive Action: Leveraging Uncertainty in Your Organization

By Glenda H. Eoyang; Royce J. Holladay | Go to book overview

13
LESSONS FOR SO WHAT?
Engaging in the So what? step of the Adaptive Action cycle helps us make meaning of the data and information we collect during the What? In this step, we examine information to formulate possible options for action that move us toward adaptation and fitness in our environment. The descriptions and stories of the current situation are assessed in terms of the conditions they set for self-organizing. As the most relevant containers, differences, and exchanges are recognized and named, they begin to hint at options for effective action.Associates who shared their stories with us for this book offer powerful reinforcements for the lessons we have learned for So what?
Share the exploration.
Visit the extreme edges.
Find what fits.

Share the Exploration

As we pointed out in Chapter 3, the What? step of Adaptive Action depends on diverse points of view and a variety of insights because the purpose is to explore the widest possible range of reasonable interpretations. Raw material for this step comes from yourself and others; from near and far; from evidence of subjective, normative, and objective truths. Whether you are working in a static, dynamic, or dynamical change process, you are more likely to capture the fullness of the open, high-dimension, nonlinear reality that shapes your patterns if you include more, and different, perspectives in your analysis. “Share the exploration” is all about connecting with others who can help you see and gather information about the patterns that inform your Adaptive Action. It contains specific suggestions for how to include others effectively:

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Adaptive Action: Leveraging Uncertainty in Your Organization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Part I- What Causes Uncertainty? What Can You Do about It? 1
  • Why So Uncertain? 3
  • 2- What Can You Do? 13
  • 3- What? 34
  • 4- So What? 66
  • 5- Now What? 84
  • 6- Now What? Again 103
  • Part II- So What Does Adaptive Action Look like on the Ground? 111
  • 7- Adaptive Action in Action 113
  • 8- Capacity Building 123
  • 9- Leading Change 146
  • 10- Working as a Social Act 160
  • Part III- Now What Will You Do? 183
  • 11- Gaps Revisited 185
  • 12- Lessons for What? 189
  • 13- Lessons for So What? 200
  • 14- Lessons for Now What? 209
  • 15- Adaptive Innovation 218
  • Reference Matter 239
  • Notes 241
  • Index 245
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