Adaptive Action: Leveraging Uncertainty in Your Organization

By Glenda H. Eoyang; Royce J. Holladay | Go to book overview

INDEX
Italicized page numbers refer to Figures.
action, options for. See options for action
adaptation: adapting to changing life, 155– 59; alternative organizational functions and, 219; versus “change management,” 229; each act generates need for next, 106; measurement and evaluation of, 232; as reinforcing similarities to make coherent patterns emerge, 45; risks of, 221; rules for establishing conditions for, 96. See also Adaptive Action; adaptive capacity
Adaptive Action: in action, 113–22; adaptive innovation, 218–37; for Alzheimer’s sufferers, 123–32, 201, 202, 203, 210, 212; as automatic habit, 203; for capacity building, 123–45; complex adaptive systems as foundation of, 13,18; in connecting work to social change, 160–81; conscious, 8, 73, 85, 90, 104, 128, 174; cycles embedded inside one another, 32–33; defined, 30–33; depiction of, 30; in design process consulting, 132–37; in diversity training, 167–73, 206–8, 210; in dynamical leadership, 151–55, 211, 213–15; in educational reform, 107–8, 147–51, 189–92, 211, 22324; emerges from CDE model theory of action, 89; in experiential learning, 129, 161–67, 194~97> 204–5, 211; flexibility of, 32, 103, 137, 188, 237; foundational elements of, 19–30; framed as series of questions, 32; in generative engagement, 173; how it can shape organizational work, 183–237; inquiry in, 38–42; as iterative, 31–32, 106–7; as needed, 4; new ways of thinking about uncertainty generated by, 218–19; the next What?, 108–9, 216; no permanent boundaries in, 218; Now What? question, 30, 84–109; as only effective and sustainable way to play infinite games, 89–90, 92; as only way to reduce risk of uncertainty in dynamical change, 32, 64; as paradigm shift from finite to infinite games, 118; parallel processing in, 104; pattern identification in, 42–46; in personal transformation, 15559, 192–94, 211, 212; power of, 20, 33, 105, 108, 109, 114, 160, 185; in public policy advocacy, 173–80, 210, 215–16; in quality improvement, 137–43, 197–98; simplicity of, 32, 35, 103, 123, 237; So What? question, 30, 66–83; tips for infinite games, 188; twenty-first-century challenges to, 185–87; as variable, 103–6, 173; as variation on old idea, 31; what it looks like on the ground, 111–81; What? question, 30, 34–65
adaptive capacity, 123–45; adaptive learning for building, 224; assessing, 232; coevolving with the system as it changes, 25; and data analysis, 186; in educational reform, 107; improving theory and practice of, 8–9; in Obama campaign, 187; possibility of building, 5; in public policy advocates, 173, 187; in self-organizing teams, 161
Alzheimer’s disease, 123–32, 201, 202, 203, 210
Art of Hosting, 201
assumptions: differences disturb, 51; of the past, 32; questioning your, 192–94, 204
atomism, 14–17

-245-

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Adaptive Action: Leveraging Uncertainty in Your Organization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Part I- What Causes Uncertainty? What Can You Do about It? 1
  • Why So Uncertain? 3
  • 2- What Can You Do? 13
  • 3- What? 34
  • 4- So What? 66
  • 5- Now What? 84
  • 6- Now What? Again 103
  • Part II- So What Does Adaptive Action Look like on the Ground? 111
  • 7- Adaptive Action in Action 113
  • 8- Capacity Building 123
  • 9- Leading Change 146
  • 10- Working as a Social Act 160
  • Part III- Now What Will You Do? 183
  • 11- Gaps Revisited 185
  • 12- Lessons for What? 189
  • 13- Lessons for So What? 200
  • 14- Lessons for Now What? 209
  • 15- Adaptive Innovation 218
  • Reference Matter 239
  • Notes 241
  • Index 245
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