Days of National Festivity in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1823-1889

By Hendrik Kraay | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Constructing the Monarchy, 1823–1829

The last years of João VI’s reign in Rio de Janeiro left imperial Brazil a vibrant tradition of commemorating the birthdays, weddings, and accessions of monarchs and other members of the royal family with illuminations, ephemeral architecture, Te Deums, military parades, fireworks, theater galas, and artillery salutes. Late-colonial ritual forms suited the monarchy that Pedro I sought to establish, and little distinguished imperial civic ritual from its colonial predecessor until early 1830. However, the new regime was a constitutional monarchy—Pedro stressed that his power derived from both the people and from divine grace—and this lent a different tone to the celebrations of the new empire, especially given the nagging doubts about Pedro’s commitment to the charter that he granted in 1824.

From 1823 through 1829, civic ritual presented Pedro I as a legitimate monarch, founder of the nation-state, and grantor of the constitution. Few discordant voices can be heard in the documentation from these years, largely because de facto press censorship and the more general repression of Pedro’s critics after 1823 limited the scope of political debate until the late 1820s.1 Foreign observers, both diplomats and travelers, did not face these restrictions, and in this chapter, their observations and assessments provide an essential counterpoint to official rhetoric. Independence was intimately connected to the issue of the form of government— indeed, one historian has recently pointed out that, in the parlance of the day, independência meant not just autonomy from Portugal but also an antiabsolutist political position.2

Until the mid-1820s, it was not entirely clear on which days the new empire’s foundation should be celebrated. Several dates (celebrated with some regularity in the capital) and the elaborate rituals associated with Pedro’s return from his journey to Salvador in 1826 underscored a monarchical

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Days of National Festivity in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1823-1889
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 562

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.