Days of National Festivity in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1823-1889

By Hendrik Kraay | Go to book overview

Notes

FRONT MATTER

1. Exchange rate data is drawn from Duncan, Public and Private Operations, 183.

2. The key sources for identifying pseudonyms are Gondim, Pseudônimos; Menezes, Dicionário, 785–800; Paiva, Achêgas; Reis, Pseudonimos.


INTRODUCTION

1. Lei, 9 Sep. 1826, CLB.

2. Hobsbawm and Ranger, Invention; Halbwachs, On Collective Memory; Nora, “Between Memory.” For the case of Buenos Aires, see Acree, “Words,” 47–50.

3. Pimenta Bueno, Direito, 20.

4. Anderson, Imagined Communities.

5. For a critique of Anderson’s empirical work, see Guerra, “Forms.”

6. For such an approach, see Burns, Nationalism. For more recent approaches, see Doyle and Pamplona, Nationalism.

7. Condy Raguet to Sec. of State, Rio, 23 Sep. 1826, NARS, M-121, roll 7.

8. I examine this debate and these days’ meaning in Chapter One.

9. Kertzer, Ritual, 37–39, 72–73, 131–34.

10. Geertz, Negara, 13. See also his application of this model to other societies in Geertz, “Centers.” Kertzer expands on this in his argument that ritual is central to all forms of politics, Ritual, passim.

11. Watanabe-O’Kelly, “Festival Books”; Buc, Dangers. For expositions of tropes in the accounts of Portuguese and colonial Brazilian civic rituals, see Megiani, Rei, 200–10, 225–81, 287–88; Schiavinatto, “Entre os manuscritos,” 17–24.

12. On these questions, see the essays in Hüsken, When Rituals Go Wrong; Sax, Quack, and Weinhold, Problem.

13. For an introduction to these points, see Muir, Ritual, chap. 7. On Roman precedents, see Sumi, Ceremony.

14. Zaho, Imago; Mateos Royo, “All the Town,” 177–78, 188. On Roman triumphs, see Beard, Roman Triumph.

-395-

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