Dolores del Río: Beauty in Light and Shade

By Linda B. Hall | Go to book overview

9
Return

What could be better for the national film industry than the return
of Dolores in 1943? Del Río: the artistic guarantee of excellence,
the center of all social life, the de luxe hostess.

Carlos Monsiváis, “Dolores del Río”1

Del Rio’s wartime return to Mexico represented not only the push
of a US industry that had type-cast her as the exotic “other” but
also the pull of the developing Mexican industry that offered an
opportunity to apply her Hollywood-training to better roles in first-
rate films that played internationally to Latin American audiences.

Seth Fein, “Hollywood and United States–Mexico
Relations in the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema”2

DEL RÍO RETURNED TO MEXICO with no promises of work, but she quickly established herself as the center of a social and intellectual group reflected in the invitation list to her birthday party in 1942. Emilio “El Indio” Fernández, who directed her first pictures after her return, called her “an overwhelming figure, the most important in Mexican cinema,” and cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa commented reverently, “[Dolores] instilled in all of us a kind of mysticism.”3 Dolores herself emphasized in her conversations that Mexico’s cinema should become Mexican cinema, a stance in which she was reinforced by longtime friend Diego Rivera, and it should have an artistic dimension in line with the intellectual/artistic renaissance that had been going on in Mexico since the end of the Revolution. Fernández directed two films that reestablished her as a Mexican star, films whose themes emphasized the

-204-

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Dolores del Río: Beauty in Light and Shade
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Translation and Orthography xiii
  • 1 - Beauty, Celebrity, and Power in Two Cultures 1
  • 2 - Mexican Princess 21
  • 3 - Hollywood Baby Beauty 43
  • 4 - Unwelcome Triangle 70
  • 5 - Pushing the Envelope 92
  • 6 - Fame and Its Perils 121
  • 7 - Second Chance 146
  • 8 - Affair 176
  • 9 - Return 204
  • 10 - Resurrection 225
  • 11 - Diva 252
  • 12 - Icon 275
  • Reference Matter 299
  • Notes 301
  • Filmography 335
  • Bibliography 337
  • Index 343
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