Learning to Forget: US Army Counterinsurgency Doctrine and Practice from Vietnam to Iraq

By David Fitzgerald | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Victor H. Krulak, “Address by Major General Victor H. Krulak, USMC, Special Assistant to Director, Joint Chiefs of Staff, for Counterinsurgency and Special Activities, to Army War College, Wednesday, 23 May 1962: Tactics and Techniques of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency,” May 23, 1962, Army War College Lectures, box 1961–1962–6 lectures AY 1961–62, folder 6, Maj. Gen. Krulak (Carlisle, PA: U.S. Army Military History Institute).

2. Ibid.

3. In 1991, President George H. W. Bush claimed in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War that “the specter of Vietnam has been buried forever in the desert sands of the Arabian Peninsula”; President George H. W. Bush, Radio Address to U.S. Armed Forces Stationed in the Persian Gulf Region, March 2, 1991, George H. W. Bush Presidential Library Website, available at http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/ research/papers/1991/91030200.html. President Barack Obama denied any validity in Vietnam–Afghanistan comparisons during his speech announcing that extra troops would be sent to Afghanistan; “Obama’s Address on the War in Afghanistan,” The New York Times, December 2, 2009, available at www.nytimes.com/2009/12/02/world/ asia/02prexy.text.html.

4. For a full discussion of the literature on the Vietnam–Iraq analogy, see David Ryan and David Fitzgerald, “Iraq and Vietnam: Endless Recurrence or Stirrings Still?” Critical Asian Studies 41, no. 4 (December 2009), 621–653.

5. Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen, “The History of a Lesson: The Social Construction of the Past,” Review of International Studies 29, no. 3 (2003), 499–519.

6. Russell Weigley, A History of the Unites States Army (New York: MacMillan, 1967), 161.

-215-

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