Mediating the Global: Expatria's Forms and Consequences in Kathmandu

By Heather Hindman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THE DEBTS THAT ONE ACCRUES as part of the process of thinking about, researching and writing a book are diverse and innumerable. It was only midway into the process of this book that I began to understand its genesis in my grand parents’ expatriate experiences. Robert and Ethel Stewart lived in many locations, places I came to know through stories of life in Switzerland, the Netherlands and Japan, and later through trinkets and coins brought back from short trips to Asia, Africa, Europe and South America. While I long credited my grandfather for my wanderlust, I did not understand why I was drawn to understand Expatria until the project had already taken over my life.

This project and its intellectual merit, if there is any, developed from the rich intellectual communities I was embraced by, first at Reed College and later at the University of Chicago. The workshop culture at Chicago and the friends I developed out of it were the incubator, if not always a nurturing one, for this project. Colleagues in the workshops and coerced readers were invaluable in helping me to cohere the ideas that evolved into this book, including Anne Bartlett, Beth Buggenhagen, Kathleen Fernicola, Liz Garland, Sean Gilsdorf, R. Scott Hansen, Jenny Huberman, Matt Hull, Chris Nelson, Marina Peterson, Clare Sammells, Tara Schwegler, Amanda Seaman, Evalyn Tennant and Emily Vogt. I was also lucky to have a cohort of Nepal colleagues who were a source of comfort and challenge in two continents: Mary Cameron, Tatsuro Fujikura, Greg Grieve, Susan Hangen, Genevieve Lakier, Lauren Leve, Geeta Manandhar, Peter Moran, Katherine Rakin and Abe Zablocki. Jim Fisher, David Gellner, Mark Liechty and Kamala Visweswaran offered support in ways which will leave me always in debt. As a counterbalance for all the pain endured while in graduate school, the prodding of brilliant faculty is something

-vii-

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