Mediating the Global: Expatria's Forms and Consequences in Kathmandu

By Heather Hindman | Go to book overview

2 Families That Fail:
The Mechanisms and Labor of Productivity

ALISON’S HONEYMOON TRIP was her first experience of travel outside of the United States, and it was only the beginning of her journeys. She and her fiancé had moved up the date of their wedding when Jay learned he was to be sent abroad by his company. The first household they would set up together would be in Asia, and Alison, not having lived apart from her parents during her twentytwo years of life, knew she might be in over her head, for now she was going to be an expatriate. When they arrived in Nepal, their assigned country, Jay was very busy with his new job. He had little time to contemplate or experience where they were living, while Alison was at home all day. The wives of Jay’s coworkers sought to induce Alison to come out to various events, but she usually resisted, fearing the chaos of the city and potential challenges of communication and transit. One woman did finally convince her to attend a ladies’ lunch, and it was there we met. Alison’s life before marriage had consisted of working in a clothing shop in a local mall and absorbing herself in the science fiction books that initially brought her and Jay together. She was eager to find others who were young and childless in an expatriate community that was mainly families with school-aged children or empty nesters. As December approached, Alison drew despondent thinking about a Christmas without her parents and younger brother, but she knew Jay’s success depended on their successful completion of this and perhaps other international assignments. Alison was concerned that her lack of social interaction was harming Jay’s career, marking the couple as a “problem family.” As I was returning to the United States for a visit in December, I asked if there was anything I could bring her, and she made two requests: a recently released science fiction book by her favorite author and Saint John’s wort, which she had read was useful

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mediating the Global: Expatria's Forms and Consequences in Kathmandu
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.