Dilemmas of Reconciliation: Cases and Concepts

By Carol A.L. Prager; Trudy Govier | Go to book overview

2
What Is Acknowledgement and
Why Is It Important?

Trudy Govier


Introduction

In an intriguing work on intractable conflict between nations and groups, Thomas Scheff theorizes that a major underlying cause of such conflict is to be found in cycles of humiliation and rage. Toward the end of his book Bloody Revenge, Scheff suggests that acknowledgement of feelings may have an important role to play in the resolution of such conflicts. He mentions apologies as a form of acknowledgement and suggests that a greater acknowledgement of human interdependence and less denial would have positive effects on some ongoing conflicts.1 Joseph Montville, director of a program on preventive diplomacy, also claims that acknowledgement of wrongdoing, often expressed through formal apology, is profoundly important for the healing of victims and their reconciliation with perpetrators.2 Michael Ignatieff makes similar claims about apology and acknowledgement at the end of The Warrior’s Honour, his book about the horrifying breakdown of moral codes characteristic of ethnic violence, especially in Yugoslavia. Ignatieff boldly claims that had President Tudjman of Croatia officially apologized to Serbs for the violence committed by the fascist Ustache during the Second World War, the fears of Serbs living within Croatia would have been soothed and the brutal Balkan wars of the nineties would not have happened. The apology would have served to acknowledge past wrongdoing and suffering and announce a break from it.3 In her recent work Between Vengeance and Forgiveness, Martha

Notes to chapter 2 are on pp. 87-89.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dilemmas of Reconciliation: Cases and Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 362

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.