Enterprise Resource Planning: Management, Social and Organizational Issues

By Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah | Go to book overview

Analyzing ERP Implementation at a Public
University Using the Innovation Strategy Model

Keng Siau Jake Messersmith
Department of Management
University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have revolutionized the way companies
are using information technology in their businesses. ERP was created in an effort to
streamline business processes and has proven to be successful in many operations.
Unfortunately, not all ERP implementations have met expectations. One way that
businesses may be able to increase success rates is to embrace creativity and innova-
tion in their ERP implementations. For businesses to do this, they must first under-
stand how creativity originates and how that creativity can be integrated into business
solutions. This article presents a case study that examines the ERP implementation at a
public university and analyzes the applicability of the Innovation Strategy Model on
public sector organizations.


1. INTRODUCTION

Since the end of World War II, technology-based innovations have been advancing in rapid succession. They have been seen as the crucial source of societal prosperity as well as the universal remedy for all business problems (Burgleman & Maidique, 1988). In fact, technology today is speeding up the pace of daily operations, forcing organizations to keep their information accurate and available in real time. These market demands have given birth to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems (Lee, Siau, & Hong, 2003). The idea behind ERP software is to integrate business functions into one networked database. One of the key selling points of ERP systems is that they offer integration across the entire business, including Human Resources, Accounting, Manufacturing, Materials Management, and all other business modules (Davenport, 1998). This integration means streamlined processes, better customer service and, in turn, added value to the company. Unfortunately, many ERP systems have not lived up to their promises (Siau & Messersmith, 2002). One factor leading to the disenchantment of many corporations that have attempted to imple-

Requests for reprints should be sent to Keng Siau, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, NE 68588–0491.
E-mail: ksiau@unl.edu

-57-

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