Art at Auction in 17th Century Amsterdam

By John Michael Montias | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

It is a pleasure to look back on the numerous letters, e-mail exchanges, and conversations that I have had over the years with my friends and colleagues about the contents of this book. They all added to my knowledge or corrected mistakes I had made. I mention Marten Jan Bok first because, in addition to his frequent help, he encouraged me to write a book about auctions of works of art in Amsterdam, at a time when I had just begun to collect sales inventories for my database.1 I am also grateful to him for helping me in the finishing stages of publishing this book, with checking information, with the collection of illustrations, and with other matters to which I was not able to attend. Paul Crenshaw read the latest version of the book in typescript and gave me the benefit of his perceptive comments. Albert Blankert, Alan Chong, Neil DeMarchi, Amy Golahny, Anne Goldgar, Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann, Walter Liedtke, Otto Naumann, Gary Schwartz, and Michael Zell commented on individual chapters, some of which were published elsewhere. Jeroen van Meerwijk contributed to my research on notarial inventories and made a special investigation at my request of the court cases involving the art dealer Johannes de Renialme in the Rijksarchief in The Hague. S. Middelhoek and Wout Spies helped with my genealogical research on the Van Maerlen and Van Soldt families (Chapter 19) and on Robbert van der Hoeve (Chapter 21). In the last stages of revision, Louisa Ruby of the Frick Art Reference Library answered many questions about my database on Amsterdam inventories, to which, due to a computer breakdown, I no longer had access. David Smith of CUADRA Associates gave me his patient, unstinting, and efficient help with my software problems and with the development of my databank on Amsterdam auction sales and inventories. Suzanne Bogman and Chantal Nicolaes of Amsterdam University Press, who carefully copy-edited the typescript, helped to guide the book to its completion. I am grateful to them all.

John Michael Montias
New Haven, June 2002

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