The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays

By Eugene Davidson | Go to book overview

3
THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE

The promise of sensible, rational, mutually advantageous developments in the area of American-European relations is superficially more glittering now than it has been since the early days of the NATO alliance. In economic policies, both this country and Western Europe are committed to fostering wider trading areas, the reduction of tariffs, and many other artificial restraints to the exchange of products wherever trading is considered to be advantageous, politically in many cases as well as economically. In political matters, since the invasion of Czechoslovakia on August 21, 1948, critics of the United States and Western Europe are far less inclined than they were before that date to wish to see the American presence in Europe diminished to some kind of shade that can be exercised or summoned at will.

The rising tide of anti-Americanism that was given great impetus by the Vietnam War has been at least held in check by the force of the more than half a million East Bloc troops that moved swiftly into Czechoslovakia. Europe has always been sensitive to troop movements; even a few regiments sent up to a frontier have in the past been immediately registered in the seismographs of European capitals. And this massive movement of Warsaw Bloc forces had no need of the seismographs in chancelleries; every man and woman in the street registered the change out of his or her own experience.

Presented at the National War College, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1969.

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part I - Foreign Affairs 1
  • 1 - The Nuremberg Trials and One World 3
  • 2 - Nuremberg 21
  • 3 - The United States and Europe 28
  • 4 - Visiting China 47
  • 5 - The Narrow Path of Freedom 56
  • 6 - Global Aspects of East-West Relations 62
  • 7 - The End of the Cold War? 69
  • 8 - Saddam and a New World Order 73
  • Part II - The Idea of History 77
  • 9 - History as It Really Is 79
  • 10 - Domestic Peace 84
  • 11 - Looking Backward 90
  • 12 - The Thin Coat of the Higher Learning 95
  • 13 - The Path of the West 103
  • 14 - The Further Decline of the West 110
  • Part III - Individuals 115
  • 15 - Remembrance of Uncle Charlie 117
  • 16 - Albert Speer 134
  • 17 - Ezra Pound 138
  • 18 - The Suzette Morton Davidson Gallery 146
  • Index 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.