A Goy Who Speaks Yiddish: Christians and the Jewish Language in Early Modern Germany

By Aya Elyada | Go to book overview

Conclusion

In recent years there has been a growing tendency among scholars to replace older views of medieval and early modern Christian-Jewish relations with a more complex historical understanding. Instead of formulating these relations solely in terms of isolation, persecution, and toleration, newer historiography also emphasizes the cultural, social, and intellectual interaction between Jews and Christians. For historians looking to highlight the aspect of contact and cultural exchange in early modern Christian-Jewish relations, the field of Christian Hebraism seems to be particularly attractive. The engagement of Christian Hebraists with Jewish texts, as well as their cooperation with Jewish translators, compositors, and proofreaders, present this field as a natural site for encounters between Jews and Christians.1 The question of course is how to interpret these encounters. One approach is presented for example in some of the essays collected in the volume Hebraica Veritas? from 2004, in a section entitled “Negotiating Dialogue.” Although it by no means disregards the polemical and missionary impulses that characterized the work of many Christian Hebraists, this approach nonetheless seeks to emphasize the more positive implications of Christian Hebraism for Christian-Jewish relations in early modern Europe. The relevant essays in Hebraica Veritas? thus point out “the efforts—on both Jewish and Christian sides—to forge some form of dialogue that bespeaks the potential (if not the reality) of mutual respect,” as well as the idea that “the engagement of Christians with Jews and Jewish texts could lead to a greater sympathy between the two groups and contribute to emerging ideas of ecumenism and tolerance.”2 Another approach, promoted for instance in the works of Jonathan M. Hess and Susannah Heschel,3 defines Christian-Jewish relations in terms of power, domination, and

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Goy Who Speaks Yiddish: Christians and the Jewish Language in Early Modern Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.