After the Revolution: Youth, Democracy, and the Politics of Disappointment in Serbia

By Jessica Greenberg | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Yugoslavia was a member of the Non-Aligned Movement, a network of nations that fell outside the Western European—American and Soviet spheres of influence during the Cold War. Tito’s leadership of the Non-Aligned Movement contributed greatly to Yugoslavia’s international status and its ability to negotiate an alternative position in the Cold War world. Tito broke with the Soviet Union in 1948, ensuring financial support from the West that enabled two decades of rising living standards for many citizens of Yugoslavia.

2. The segment of the speech quoted here can be viewed in the documentary Ako Srbija Stane, YouTube video, 9:26, posted by “Novosadjan,” November 25, 2006, http://www .youtube.com/watch?v=OWWH3kCGNFM.

3. “5. oktobar—12 godina razočaranja,” b92.net, October 5, 2012, http://www.b92.net/ info/vesti/index.php?yyyy=2012&mm=10&dd=05&nav_id=648804.

4. Slobodan Milošević came to power as a Communist Party functionary in the late 1980s and was elected president of Serbia in the first wave of democratic elections across socialist Yugoslavia in 1990. He ruled Serbia from 1990 to 2000, maintaining his regime through corruption and cronyism, crackdowns on dissidents, and an atmosphere of fear and intense nationalism. As Yugoslavia disintegrated in a violent civil war, Milošević promoted military action across the former Yugoslavia, including state support for paramilitary groups involved in acts of genocide and ethnic cleansing. Meanwhile, back at home in Serbia, Milošević presided over a rapidly impoverished population, including waves of refugees and a declining urban middle class. In 1999, after Milošević refused to withdraw troops from the province of Kosovo (an Albanian-majority province fighting for independence from Serbia), the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) bombed the country for three months straight, destroying civilian as well as military targets, public infrastructure, and much of Serbia’s remaining industrial base.

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