Insufficient Funds: The Culture of Money in Low-Wage Transnational Families

By Hung Cam Thai | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1

1. Except for instances in which I wish to magnify the meanings of the term “immigrant,” I will generally use the terms “migrants” and “non-migrants,” instead of the crystallized term “immigrants.” I do so to underscore the nature of migration as a process, rather than to label migration as a uni-directional status that characterizes the term “immigrants.” For discussion of this distinction, see Mahler 1995, 5.

2. I will go into more detail about this history in Chapter 2.

3. Regarding note 1, the terminology gets even more complicated when we refer to labels such as “transnational migrants” and “transmigrants.” I will rarely use these terms in this book because they are meaningless to my respondents, who only call themselves migrants, immigrants, overseas migrants, or non-migrants, even if they lead transnational lives. I am aware, however, of the literature that uses the term “transmigrants”; see, for example, Schiller 1999; Schiller, Basch, and Blanc 1995.

4. I have changed all real names to protect the confidentiality of respondents.

5. Although the metric system prevails in Vietnam, I have converted all measurements to the imperial (standard) measuring system for clarity to readers in the United States.

6. All four of her siblings work in garment factories nearby, one of the largest labor niches in Thu Duc. Only one sister, Lan, moved to the city to work in a tailor shop.

7. For a lengthy treatment of the situation among unaccompanied refugee minors who were part of the exodus after the Vietnam War, and who were later either sponsored to the West or repatriated to Vietnam, see Freeman and Huu 2003.

8. I have chosen to retain the real names of all public spaces I refer to throughout the book. Some of them, such as the Monaco Club, have closed down since I began the field-

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