What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China

By Tobie Meyer-Fong | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Writing a book about death and violence has been painful; I have tried to respect the suffering of those I write about by not making this a book about us and our times and our theories, although of course there are resonances. This is ultimately a book about people in the past, what they lost, and how they lived and died and remembered. I am grateful to them for leaving traces that allow us a partial glimpse of their world.

For their generous support of this project, I thank the American Council of Learned Societies, the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, and Johns Hopkins University. Special thanks to Carolyn Brown and Mary Lou Reker at the Kluge Center and the staff of the Asian Division at the Library of Congress. Without the Library of Congress and its Asian Division, there would be no book—or rather this would be a very different book, and I feel very fortunate to have the Library of Congress as my neighborhood library.

In the course of researching this book, I have made use of the Nanjing University Library, the Nanjing Library, the Shanghai Library, Fudan University Library, East China Normal University Library, the Yangzhou Library, the National Library of China’s Beihai Branch, the Chinese Academy of Sciences Library, the Taiping History Museum, the library at the Tōyō Bunka Kenkyũjo, Harvard-Yenching Library, the East Asian Library at Stanford, The C. V. Starr East Asian Library at Columbia University, and the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at Johns Hopkins. I am grateful to the staff at all of these excellent institutions for their able assistance and advice. Special thanks are due to Shi Mei at the Nanjing University Library and to Zeng Yuanyuan, Ye Yunshan, and Chella Vaidyanathan at Hopkins.

It is a privilege to be a member of the History Department at Johns Hopkins University, not least because I have had the opportunity to share pieces from this project in the Department Seminar. In that context, I have benefited from my colleagues’ intense questions and insights. I am grateful es

-xi-

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What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Author’s Note xv
  • Chapter One- War 1
  • Chapter Two- Words 21
  • Chapter Three- Marked Bodies 65
  • Chapter Four- Bones and Flesh 99
  • Chapter Five- Wood and Ink 135
  • Chapter Six- Loss 175
  • Chapter Seven- Endings 203
  • Notes 209
  • Glossary 271
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 305
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