What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China

By Tobie Meyer-Fong | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. See for example, William Hail, Tsêng Kuo-fan and the Taiping Rebellion, with a Short Sketch of his Later Career, 2nd ed. (1927; reprint, New York: Paragon Book Reprint Corp., 1964), xiii. He cites the 1883 revised edition of Samuel Wells Williams’s classic work, The Middle Kingdom: A Survey of the Geography, Government, Literature, Social Life, Arts, and History of the Chinese Empire and Its Inhabitants, stating that “it has been estimated by foreigners living at Shanghai that, during the whole period from 1851 to 1865, fully twenty millions of human beings were destroyed in connection with the Tai-ping rebellion.” Ho Ping-ti discusses these figures, raising questions about their accuracy. See Studies on the Population of China (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1959), 246–247. However, Ho affirms that this was one of the most devastating wars in human history, 238.

2. See for example Jiang Tao, “Taiping tianguo zhanzheng yu wan Qing renkou,” in Wan Qing guojia yu shehui, ed. Zhongguo shehui kexueyuan (Beijing: Shehui kexue wenxian chubanshe, 2007), 3–13, and Hua Qiang and Cai Hongjun, “Taiping tianguo shiqi Zhongguo renkou sunshi wenti,” in ibid., 64–75. For an older but still very useful article, see Yeh-chien Wang, “The Impact of the Taiping Rebellion on the Population in Southern Kiangsu,” Papers on China, Harvard University, East Asia Research Center 19 (December 1965): 120–158.

3. Mary B. Rankin, Elite Activism and Political Transformation in China: Zhejiang Province, 1865–1911 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1986), 55.

4. Mark S. Schantz, Awaiting the Heavenly Country: The Civil War and America’s Culture of Death 1. On (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008), 1. On civilian deaths, and the challenge of calculating their numbers, see Drew Gilpin Faust, This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (New York: Knopf, 2008), xii. A recent article in the New York Times suggests that the numbers should be revised upward by 20 percent to 750,000 on the basis of census data. The new number does not account for civilian deaths. “New Estimate Raises Civil War Death Toll,” New York Times, April 3, 2012, D1, 3.

5. Paul Cohen notes that many undergraduates in his survey course on late imperial China had prior knowledge of the Boxers, whereas relatively few had heard of

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What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Author’s Note xv
  • Chapter One- War 1
  • Chapter Two- Words 21
  • Chapter Three- Marked Bodies 65
  • Chapter Four- Bones and Flesh 99
  • Chapter Five- Wood and Ink 135
  • Chapter Six- Loss 175
  • Chapter Seven- Endings 203
  • Notes 209
  • Glossary 271
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 305
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