What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China

By Tobie Meyer-Fong | Go to book overview

Index
Note: page numbers in italics refer to figures. Those followed by n refer to notes, with note number.
accents, as identity markers, 66–67, 68
“An Account of the Vicissitudes of a Leftover Life” (Xu Feng’en), 184, 244–45n64
The Album of the Famished (Jimin tushuo), 52, 226n122
Ancestral Leaves (Esherick), 164
Anhui Army soldiers, and commemoration of war dead, 145
Anzhen militia, 73–74, 88
archives on Taiping Rebellion, reliability of, 98
armies and militias, desperation and disorder of, 6–7
“Artemisia Odes” (Zhang Guanglie), 183–84, 186
bandits: side-switching by, 71, 72; impersonation of military units by, 70
baojuan. See precious volumes
Bao Lisheng, 227n7
barbers, and wartime hairstyles, 86–88, 87, 89
“The Beggar Boy Speaks” (Zhang Guanglie), 198–99
belt tags as identity markers, 67–68
Biographies of the Loyal and Righteous of Liangjiang (Liangjiang zhongyi zhuan), 166–67, 171–73
Blakiston, Thomas, 81
Board of Rites, 136, 141, 144, 146, 164, 171, 189
bones of unclaimed dead: and lost identity, 114–15; mass burial of, 122; as symbol of social collapse, 120; ubiquity of after war, 122. See also entries under dead bodies
books: lascivious, as misuse of written word, 26; spirit-written, 23, 27; as talismanic object in Yu Zhi, 40. See also gazetteer(s); meritorious books (shan shu); precious volumes (baojuan)
books honoring war dead, local production of, 136, 147–48, 155, 163–71; and cachet of imperial symbols, 164–65; children, inclusion of, 167; critiques of imperial government in, 168, 169, 173; and dissemination of state policies on commemoration, 164; editors of, as intermediaries between local and imperial interests, 164; funding of, 163, 165, 170; imperial recognition of, 169–70, 171; praise for war leaders in, 158, 163; for private use, 165, 168; range in quality of production, 164; and rank, importance of recording, 166; as research tools for relatives, 170; and state-subject relationship, 163; as testament to place’s restoration in political order, 152, 153; tradition of, 163, 259n105; and victims, translation into martyrs, 164
Bowring, Lewin, 95
“Brief Account of the Martyrdom of Mother Hong” (Jin Changfu), 110
Brine, Lindesey, 81
Brook, Timothy, 52, 226n122
Brown, Jeremy, 249n122
Bruce, Frederick, 80
brutality of Taiping Rebellion, 6–7; issues raised by, 12; Taiping rebels’ brutality, 53–56, 54, 55, 115, 117, 126; underlying causes of, 7–8

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
What Remains: Coming to Terms with Civil War in 19th Century China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Author’s Note xv
  • Chapter One- War 1
  • Chapter Two- Words 21
  • Chapter Three- Marked Bodies 65
  • Chapter Four- Bones and Flesh 99
  • Chapter Five- Wood and Ink 135
  • Chapter Six- Loss 175
  • Chapter Seven- Endings 203
  • Notes 209
  • Glossary 271
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.