Piety and Politics: The Dynamics of Royal Authority in Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Babylonian Mesopotamia

By Dale Launderville | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Communication and Discernment
of the Divine Will: An Essential Task
for Individual and Collective Development

Fundamental to the traditional pattern for legitimating royal authority were the claims that sovereignty resided in the divine realm and that a king ruled legitimately only by obeying the king of the gods. The earthly king could increase his authority in the community by persuading the various officials and peoples within the community that he had been chosen for his role by the king of the gods. His rhetorical efforts were not mere ornamentation or ceremony that served as a supplement to the security and material prosperity he brought to the land but rather were integral to the power and stability of his reign. The court poets employed by the king aimed to communicate through their compositions the aura and the terror of the king as evidence of his divine election.1 Their words drew upon the traditions of the community in order to make intelligible the legitimacy of the king’s rule, particularly to those whose support was vital to the king’s effectiveness.

The traditions that resonated with the people were rooted in the collective memory of the people and so were not simply the property of the royal court.2

1. Sabina Franke, Königsinschriften und Königsideologie: Die Könige von Akkade zwischen Tradition und Neuerung (Münster: LIT, 1995), pp. 32, 37; Claus Wilcke, “Politik im Spiegel der Literatur: Literatur als Mittel der Politik im alteren Babylonien,” in Anfänge politischen Denkens in der Antike: Die nahöstlichen Kulturen und die Griechen, ed. K. Raaflaub and E. MüllerLuckner (Munich: Oldenbourg, 1993), pp. 63, 66.

2. Gerdien Jonker, The Topography of Remembrance: The Dead, Tradition, and Collective Memory in Mesopotamia, Studies in the History of Religions 68 (Leiden: Brill, 1995), pp. 17–18; John Miles Foley, “Individual Poet and Epic Tradition: Homer as Legendary Singer,” Arethusa 31 (1998): 169–70; Frank Moore Cross, From Epic to Canon: History and Literature in Ancient Israel (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), pp. 50–52.

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Piety and Politics: The Dynamics of Royal Authority in Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Babylonian Mesopotamia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 407

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.