Dancing at the Dawn of Agriculture

By Yosef Garfinkel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
NEOLITHIC NEAR EAST

Dancing figures from twelve Neolithic Near Eastern sites are presented in this study (Sites 1–12). These were discovered in the Levant, northern Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Cyprus (Fig. 7.1) and are dated to the eighth and seventh millennia BC. They are presented below in chronological order. The dancing scenes were depicted on a variety of objects, using different techniques:

Engraving. The earliest scenes, dated to the eighth millennium BC, appear
before the introduction of pottery and were engraved on stone vessels
and slabs (Figs. 7.3:a, 7.6:a–b). This technique almost completely disap-
peared during the seventh and sixth millennia BC but was revived in the
early fourth millennium BC when dancing scenes were adopted by seal
cutters.

Applied Plastic Relief. With the introduction of pottery in the early seventh
millennium BC, dancing scenes begin to appear on clay vessels. With this
technique the potter modeled strips of clay in the form of the human
body and applied them to the vessel’s exterior. Sometimes other details,
such as fingers and toes, were emphasized by incisions. Most of the items
from the Neolithic Near East were made by applied plastic relief (Figs.
7.7, 7.8:a–b, d–e, 7.9:a–b).

Painting. Painting was quite rare at this early stage. One example of a
painted plaster floor, one painted plastered wall, and one pottery vessel
have been reported (Figs. 7.4, 7.9:c, 10.10:a).

Incision. In this technique the dancing figure was incised on the surface of
the pottery vessel before firing. One such example has been reported
from the Neolithic Near East (Fig. 7.8:c).


1. NEVALI çORI

This site is located in the middle Euphrates region in southeast Turkey. A large Pre-Pottery Neolithic B village, dated to the eighth millennium BC, was unearthed, revealing a rich assemblage of art objects. One outstanding find was a large public structure with benches, two monumental pillars, and a niche. A collection of life-sized anthropomorphic stone statues was unearthed inside it. This building is one of the earliest examples of a temple in the ancient Near East.

An object of special interest from this site is an engraved fragment of a rounded stone basin (Figs. 7.2, 7.3:a; Bienert and Fritz 1989; Yakar

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dancing at the Dawn of Agriculture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.