Dancing at the Dawn of Agriculture

By Yosef Garfinkel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
HALAFIAN AND
SAMARRA CULTURES

In this chapter dancing figures from thirty-five sites are presented (Sites 13–47). These examples were discovered in Mesopotamia, Anatolia, the Levant, and Armenia (Fig. 8.1). While some dating problems exist concerning Halafian and Samarra cultures in general and each site in particular, in general, excavators have reliably dated the sites to the sixth millennium BC (Watson 1983; Watkins and Campbell 1987; Akkermans 1991; Porada et al. 1992).


STYLISTIC ANALYSIS

All the objects are pottery vessels, decorated in one of three techniques: painting, applied plastic relief, and incision (Fig. 8.2).

Painting. This is the most common technique with which to depict dancing
scenes in the Halafian and Samarra cultures.

Plastic Decoration. As specified above, ribbons of clay were applied to pot-
tery vessels in this technique.

Incised Decoration. On one pottery vessel the pattern was created by inci-
sions (Fig. 8.3:d). In this technique the potter used a sharp instrument to
scratch the outer surface of the vessel before firing.

Three main styles of painting can be distinguished. This division is also relevant to the Iranian examples, which are presented in the next chapter.


THE NATURALISTIC STYLE

This term is used for cases in which an effort was made to produce a natural depiction of the human body (Figs. 8.3, 8.4). The figures are always presented in silhouette, without internal details, giving only the general outline of the body. Although this is a schematic representation, it is the most realistic in comparison to the other styles.


THE LINEAR STYLE

This style has usually been recognized as representing dancing figures in an abstract form (Herzfeld 1941:40–42; Mesnil du Buisson 1948:23; Parrot 1960:46), though some scholars differ (Braidwood et al. 1944). The style includes very schematic human figures, represented frontally in a

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dancing at the Dawn of Agriculture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.