TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 1942

After eating breakfast this morning, with nothing else to do we went off on our usual walk. The place that drew us was obviously the one where the vehicles stood waiting to transport the prisoners of war, where we could find out if there was any chance of our accompanying them to Medan, or at least as far as Kabanjahe.


Leaving Kota Cane

The long-awaited opportunity presented itself suddenly. We got on one of the vehicles that was getting ready to leave, merely as an “experiment” as we hadn’t even bothered to make any preparations for the journey. Several people in the car were wearing civilian clothes, in addition to the various former Dutch soldiers who were being transferred. One of the Dutch army officers in the group glanced at us. I don’t know whether it was because he knew who we were, but he ordered us off the vehicle. To avoid an incident that would benefit no one, we got down and moved to the vehicle behind.

As we were descending we saw Mr. T. Hukata standing beside us with another Japanese officer. He smiled at us and we returned his smile.

Our comrade, Tuan Hukata, invited us to get aboard a nearby truck. This vehicle was still empty and pretty big, with boards around it, a truck for carrying former possessions of the D.S.M. But we were happy to get permission to go along as passengers, with the one condition that we should find a chauffeur to drive the truck. This was not a difficult task, as not far away stood two former Dutch drivers whom we knew.

We told the two of them to get on the truck and asked them if they would like to drive it. We didn’t need to repeat our request, because this

-Sec1:131-

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Prisoners at Kota Cane
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Translator’s Preface 9
  • Introduction Sec1:27
  • Wednesday, March 11, 1942 Sec1:33
  • Thursday, March 12, 1942 Sec1:37
  • Friday, March 13, 1942 Sec1:43
  • Saturday, March 14, 1942 Sec1:53
  • Sunday, March 15, 1942 Sec1:67
  • Monday, March 16, 1942 Sec1:75
  • Wednesday, March 18, 1942 Sec1:79
  • Thursday, March 19, 1942 Sec1:97
  • Friday, March 20, 1942 Sec1:105
  • Saturday, March 21, 1942 Sec1:109
  • Sunday, March 22, 1942 Sec1:111
  • Monday, March 23, 1942 Sec1:113
  • Wednesday, March 25, 1942 Sec1:115
  • Thursday, March 26, 1942 Sec1:119
  • Friday, March 27, 1942 Sec1:125
  • Saturday, March 28, 1942 Sec1:127
  • Monday, March 30, 1942 Sec1:129
  • Tuesday, March 31, 1942 Sec1:131
  • Wednesday, April 1 1942 Sec1:141
  • Thursday, April 2, 1942 Sec1:145
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