The Power of Life: Agamben and the Coming Politics (To Imagine a Form of Life, II)

By David Kishik | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The philosophy of life is a strange field to navigate, but it becomes even more disorienting when your guide is a living philosopher. I would like to thank Giorgio Agamben for making this endeavor as captivating as it was liberating.

My heartfelt gratitude goes to those who, in the roles of readers and editors, made this a much better book: Mathew Abbott, Roy Ben Shai, Adam Brown, Emily-Jane Cohen, Ricky Crano, Nathan Everson, T. Fleischmann, Pavel Godfrey, Cynthia Lindlof, Yoni Molad, Idris Robinson, and last (though in all other respects first), Netta Yerushalmy.

I was not entirely surprised to discover that Wittgenstein and Agamben, my “philosophical parents” to whom I have dedicated my first two books, happened to be born on the same day as my actual mother and father. This book is dedicated to my parents, who gave me what philosophy cannot.

Essays based on parts of this book appeared in Allesdurchdringung: Texte, Essays, Gespräche über den Tanz, ed. Andreas Hiepko (Berlin: Merve Verlag, 2008); New Nietzsche Studies 8 (2010); and Telos 150 (2010). Presentations based on parts of this book were delivered at conferences at Binghamton University, New York University, and University of Massachusetts Boston.

-vi-

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The Power of Life: Agamben and the Coming Politics (To Imagine a Form of Life, II)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Abbreviations of Agamben’s Major Works vii
  • Introduction - Life in Venice 1
  • 1 - Dialectic of Endarkenment 17
  • 2 - Feather-Light Rubble 45
  • 3 - Present While Absent 73
  • 4 - How to Imagine a Form of Life 99
  • Notes 121
  • Index 131
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