Pascual de Gayangos: A Nineteenth-Century Spanish Arabist

By Cristina Álvarez Millán; Claudia Heide | Go to book overview

5
Gayangos in the English Context

Richard Hitchcock

When Pascual de Gayangos married Frances (Fanny) Revell in London on 28 October 1828, a pattern was set for his life. In an elucidating biography of the life of Gayangos up to the age of twenty-four, Joaquín Vallvé states, following Roca, that the two met in Paris, where they were staying in the same hotel.1 One assumes that this was not Gayangos’s regular abode in Paris, as his mother was at the time paying a visit. As he had been in France since 1822, he presumably spoke fluent French, and this, no doubt, was the language of communication with his future wife. The same year of 1828, he is said to have concluded his studies en lenguas orientales. This is clearly implausible. Although he had studied Arabic with Silvestre de Sacy, a distinguished and justly venerated Arabist, since 1825, during the three years between then and 1828 he could have acquired the rudiments of the language and literature, but nothing remotely sufficient for him to pursue a career as an Arabist at that stage.2 It is certain that he was studying Arabic at a propitious moment, when ‘l’étude de la langue arabe a pris en France, en Allemagne, et dans tout le nord de l’Europe, un développement plus grand qu’on n’auroit osé l’espérer’. Furthermore, ‘[une] multitude d’ouvrages ont été publiés, par le secours desquels la littérature ancienne et moderne des Arabes a été rendue accessible à beaucoup de jeunes gens …’.3 Gayangos, as an adolescent, would have been counted among these jeunes gens, and would have benefited, in his classes with de Sacy, from the latter’s desire to perfect and correct his earlier grammar.4 Perhaps as a recognition of the hold that Arabic was beginning to exert on him, he refers, in a letter to Santiago Massarnau written eighteen months after his marriage, to the only book that he had with him in Madrid at the time of writing: ‘sólo he traído mi Gramática árabe para calentarme los sesos’.5 As an adult aged thirty-two, he talks, in a letter to Navarrete, of his desire to ‘perfeccionarme en la lengua Arábiga’, clearly recognising that the process had not been completed during his time under de Sacy’s tutelage in Paris.6

Once settled in England with his wife in 1828, possessed of a fluency in French and, let us say, a reading knowledge of Arabic, there was a pressing

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pascual de Gayangos: A Nineteenth-Century Spanish Arabist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.