The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas

By Chuck Parsons | Go to book overview

APPENDIX THREE
1873 Treaty of Peace

The following “Agreement” between Tumlinson and Nichols, et al., dated August 12, 1873, appears in Robert C. Sutton Jr.’s book The Sutton-Taylor Feud, and as far as known is the only source for its existence. The original was preserved in the family of Joseph Tumlinson, then handed down to E. A. “Dogie” Wright whose copy was used by Sutton for his book. The preamble is as follows:

Be it known by those persons whose names are hereto signed, that we severally recognize the fact that disputes and controversies of a nature likely to result in blood shed have existed between the undersigned. Those whose names are in the left column hereto [are] of one party, and those whose names are in the right column of the opposite party, and for the purpose of promoting peace and quiet and order in this community, we each for himself, here promise on honor, to abstain from all hostile acts, or demonstration calculated to create a breach of peace or to induce anyone to suppose that any violence is intended. And be it further more severally known promise on honor that we will not connect ourselves with any organization of any armed character contrary to the spirit and meaning of above agreement. And we further promise and agree that should we or either [sic] of us at anytime know of any organization being in existence for the purpose of doing violence to any man whose name is hereto signed, that we will as soon as is our power to give notice of such organization to the

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