Footprints of the Welsh Indians and Sailors of the Past

By William L. Traxel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
THE ALBANS

The archaeologist employed by the National Museum had made a remark-
able discovery on Pamiok Island that he described as a “huge rectangular
structure measuring 85 feet long by 20 wide… the walls, which were
collapsed, were made of stone.”

Most of a decade had slipped away with no evidence of further interest in
the site by the museum. When asked why, a friend at the museum surrepti-
tiously replied that “certain quarters felt it could turn out to be archaeolog-
ically embarrassing, so he had decided to leave it alone…”

“…Lickspittle scholarship!” snorted Tom Lee, a talented archaeologist who
had been blacklisted for speaking out.

I sensed it was a favorite expression of his when he referred to his
colleagues who publicly only admitted finding things that their superiors
wanted found.

Farley Mowat, The Farfarers54

The first inhabitants of Great Britain entered between 8000 and 7000 B.C. Rare remains of campsites in Scotland attest to the presence of a small population of humans around 7000 B.C. Not long prior to that ice had engulfed Britain and made the islands uninhabitable. The first inhabitants of the British Isles were a non-Indo-European hunter-gathering people who are thought to have originated in Iberia and were relatives of the Basques, Iberians and

54. Mowat, Farley, The Farfarers, Steerforth Press, South Royalton, Vermont, 2000, p. 2, 202.

-27-

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Footprints of the Welsh Indians and Sailors of the Past
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Dedication ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Table of Contents lv
  • Foreword - My Story 1
  • Prologue - In the Beginnin 5
  • Book I - The Pathfinders 9
  • Chapter I - The Paleo-Americans 11
  • Chapter II - The Phoenicians 15
  • Chapter III - The Kelts 23
  • Chapter IV - The Albans 27
  • Chapter V - St. Brendon and St. Finbarr 39
  • Chapter VI - The Vikings 41
  • Book II - Madoc the Bold 55
  • Chapter VII - Tales from Wales 57
  • Chapter VIII - The Voyages 63
  • Book III - The Welsh Indians 69
  • Chapter IX - Up the Coosa River 71
  • Chapter X - To the Falls of the Ohio 89
  • Chapter XI - The Red Indians 101
  • Chapter XII - Eastern Encounters 121
  • Book IV - The Mandans 129
  • Chapter XIII - Western Encounters 131
  • Chapter XIV - Follow Your Dream 147
  • Chapter XV - Language 157
  • Chapter XVI - The Hidatsa and the Arikara 165
  • Chapter XVII - 1837 175
  • Chapter XVIII - The Fate of the Mandan 181
  • Chapter XIX - Retracing the Dream 185
  • Epilogue - Conclusions 197
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 215
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