Free Trade and Uneven Development: The North American Apparel Industry after NAFTA

By Gary Gereffi; David Spener et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book grew out of a conference on “Global Production, Regional Responses, and Local Jobs: Challenges and Opportunities in the North American Apparel Industry” that was held at Duke University in November 1997. Financial support for this meeting came from a variety of sources, including the Howard E. Jensen Fund in the Sociology Department at Duke, the North American Studies Program and the “Globalization and Equity” Common Fund project at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Conference Grant Program in the Office of the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. Gary Gereffi and Jennifer Bair co-organized the Duke conference, with the assistance of a large number of administrative support staff and student volunteers at the university.

David Spener wishes to acknowledge several institutions and individuals for their support in making publication of this book possible. First, the Ford Foundation’s Mexico City and New York offices supported the efforts of a research team, in which he was a participant, that examined economic development issues in the U.S.-Mexico border region and in the Mexican interior. This research was supported by a grant to the Population Research Center of the University of Texas at Austin and the Colegio de la Frontera Norte and included collection and analysis of data on the apparel industry in El Paso, Los Angeles, Ciudad Juárez, Monterrey, Mexico City, and Guadalajara. Second, Bryan R. Roberts, who holds the C. B. Smith Centennial Chair in U.S.-Mexico Relations at the University of Texas at Austin, provided generous financial support to Spener and other contributors to this book that permitted their participation in several meetings in diverse locales. Third, the Tom and Mary Turner Faculty Fellowship of Trinity University underwrote Spener’s contribution to the writing and editing of several of the chapters herein.

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