Sex, Men, and Babies: Stories of Awareness and Responsibility

By William Marsiglio; Sally Hutchinson | Go to book overview

3
Becoming Aware, Being Aware

For most boys, the journey through puberty and adolescence is marked by an accelerated interest in how their bodies work, change, and provide opportunities for physical pleasure. One way boys learn about their bodies is by comparing them to those of other boys and girls. The comparisons focus on overall size, weight, and musculature, as well as signs of pubertal development and emblems of masculinity, such as body hair and voice pitch. One distinctive feature of this body-oriented focus, of course, is boys’ fascination with their penis.1

Some boys find their penis intriguing, beyond seeing it merely as a pleasure-producing organ. They eventually discover that it provides them the opportunity to procreate. For some, their awareness of and response to their procreative potential furnishes a meaningful subtext to how they experience their adolescent and young adult lives. Not surprisingly, the experiences are sometimes tied to young males’ feelings about their emerging manhood. Unfortunately, most boys in the Western world do not have an explicit road map to guide them through this transitional period; they travel along without any well-defined puberty rituals. As a result, some feel confused and even anxious about the nature and meaning of the changes.

At an early age, prior to becoming aware of their procreative potential, most prepubescent boys are captivated by the pleasurable sensations they experience when their penis is rubbed or touched in a particular fashion. Much to their delight, they quickly learn that they can produce these sensations by their own playful efforts. No doubt parental and/or religious pressures cause some to feel unease, shame, and/or fear when they touch their penis, or even think about this form of self-pleasure, but most find the temptation irresistible. When boys do indulge these urges, they often develop a unique experiential bond with their penis. The distinctive physical attributes of a penis, most notably its highly visible and sometimes unpredictable tendency to change size and shape, bolsters males’ orientation

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sex, Men, and Babies: Stories of Awareness and Responsibility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • 1 - Setting the Stage 1
  • 2 - Studying Young Single Men 31
  • 3 - Becoming Aware, Being Aware 61
  • 4 - Turning Points in Identity 110
  • 5 - Romantic Involvements 139
  • 6 - Thinking about Fatherhood 176
  • 7 - Looking Forward 209
  • Appendix - Participant Profiles 241
  • Notes 245
  • References 259
  • Index 273
  • About the Authors 280
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.