The Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Fiction - Vol. 3

By John Clement Ball | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My involvement in the Encyclopedia of TwentiethCentury Fiction began three years ago with an invitation from Emma Bennett of Wiley-Blackwell and Brian Shaffer, the project’s editor-inchief. Both were tremendously helpful throughout the process and a pleasure to work with, as were Isobel Bainton and Amy Clark. I was assisted immeasurably in developing my list of headwords by colleagues who generously agreed to look over my draft lists and offer feedback; they all agreed to write entries as well, and I am grateful to them all: Jennifer Andrews, John Eustace, Chelva Kanaganayakam, Laura Moss, and Neil ten Kortenaar. Two anonymous reviewers for Wiley-Blackwell also made helpful suggestions before the assignments began, as did various contributors at later stages. I could not have finished this project on time without the expertise of three graduate students who worked as research or editorial assistants. Linnet Humble and Laura Pearson did exhaustive searches of criticism on the authors and topics covered by the volume so I could identify prospective contributors; Laura also tracked down several hundred email addresses. Joshua Prescott diligently and effectively corrected formatting and suggested line edits on numerous draft entries. For their dedication, intelligence, and work ethic, I thank all three of these most promising young researchers; my gratitude as well to the University of New Brunswick for providing funding and for sabbatical release during the busy final year in which the draft entries were submitted and edited.

To the 161 authors or co-authors of the volume’s 196 entries, this volume is as much your collective creation as it is mine. I tip my hat to you all for your willingness to hop aboard when I asked, for the insightfulness and elegant concision of your work, and for putting up with my cuts, comments, and questions. Although I know many of you, I have met the majority of you only by email, since you are as international a group as is the volume itself. Special thanks to contributors who offered or agreed to take on more than one entry, and to Rowland Smith, whose excellent entry on Nadine Gordimer arrived just three weeks before he passed away; it thus became, unexpectedly, his final piece of scholarly writing after a distinguished career.

My final thanks to my family, as always, for your loving support and inspiration.

John Clement Ball

-xiii-

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The Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Fiction - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editors i
  • The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literature WWW.Literatureencyclopedia.Com ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Notes on Contributors to Volume III xv
  • Introduction to Volume III 937
  • A 942
  • B 980
  • C 995
  • D 1034
  • E 1052
  • F 1066
  • G 1094
  • H 1121
  • I 1145
  • J 1154
  • K 1167
  • L 1180
  • M 1198
  • N 1252
  • O 1270
  • P 1277
  • Q 1296
  • R 1300
  • S 1325
  • T 1365
  • U 1370
  • V 1373
  • W 1378
  • Z 1398
  • Index 1400
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