The Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Fiction - Vol. 3

By John Clement Ball | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors to Volume III

Michelene Adams is an assistant professor of English at St. George’s University in Grenada. A Trinidadian, she graduated from the University of New Brunswick, where she wrote a doctoral thesis on Erna Brodber and Jamaica Kincaid. She has published articles on Caribbean women’s narrative in Sargasso, the College of the Bahamas Research Journal, and Anthurium.

Chiji Akoma is associate professor of English at Villanova University. He teaches African diaspora literatures and anglophone postcolonial studies. Author of Folklore in New World Black Fiction, he has also published essays in such journals as Research in African Literatures, Oral Tradition, Wasafiri, and Modern Fiction Studies.

Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandra is associate professor of English at the University of Bucharest. She holds a PhD in postcolonial literature from the University of East Anglia and has published widely on contemporary Indian fiction in English, postmodernism, women’s literature, and ethnic studies. Her latest book is Identity Performance in Contemporary Non-WASP American Fiction (2008). She is currently working on a book entitled Performance and Performativity in Contemporary Indian Fiction in English.

Stella Algoo-Baksh, professor of English at the Memorial University of Newfoundland, is the author of Austin C. Clarke: A Biography and Austin C. Clarke and His Works. Her articles and reviews appear in The Reordering of Culture: Latin America, the Caribbean and Canada: In the Hood and in Canadian Literature, English Studies in Canada, Canadian Journal of African Studies, and Journal of West Indian Literature.

Jennifer Andrews is a professor in the Department of English at the University of New Brunswick and the coeditor (with John Clement Ball) of Studies in Canadian Literature. She is the author of numerous articles on English Canadian and American literature and the co-author of Border Crossings: Thomas King’s Cultural Inversions (2003). She recently completed a new monograph on contemporary Native North American women poets.

John Attridge did his PhD at the University of Sydney on Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, and the rise of professionalism. He has written articles on Ford, Conrad, Henry James, and Murray Bail for journals such as Modernism/Modernity, ELH, and the Henry James Review. He currently teaches at the Paris Diderot University.

John Clement Ball, editor of the World Fiction volume of the ETCF, is a professor of postcolonial and Canadian literatures in the Department of English at the University of New Brunswick. He is the author of two books, Imagining London: Postcolonial Fiction and the Transnational Metropolis (2004) and Satire and the Postcolonial Novel: V. S. Naipaul, Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie (2003), and coeditor of the journal Studies in Canadian Literature.

Mita Banerjee is professor and chair of American studies at the University of Siegen, Germany. Her research interests include postcolonial literature (The Chutneyfication of History: Salman Rushdie, Michael Ondaatje, Bharati Mukherjee and the Postcolonial Debate, 2002), ethnic American literature (Race-ing the Century, 2005), and the American Renaissance (Ethnic Ventriloquism: Literary Minstrelsy in Nineteenth-Century American Literature, 2008). She is currently working on a project that explores the intersection between naturalism and naturalization in nineteenth-century American fiction.

Salhia Ben-Messahel is the author of Mind the Country: Tim Winton’s Fiction, the first booklength critical study of one of Australia’s major authors. Her publications include the editing of Des frontières de l’interculturalité, with Presses du

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The Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century Fiction - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editors i
  • The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literature WWW.Literatureencyclopedia.Com ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Entries vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Notes on Contributors to Volume III xv
  • Introduction to Volume III 937
  • A 942
  • B 980
  • C 995
  • D 1034
  • E 1052
  • F 1066
  • G 1094
  • H 1121
  • I 1145
  • J 1154
  • K 1167
  • L 1180
  • M 1198
  • N 1252
  • O 1270
  • P 1277
  • Q 1296
  • R 1300
  • S 1325
  • T 1365
  • U 1370
  • V 1373
  • W 1378
  • Z 1398
  • Index 1400
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