53 Interesting Things to Do in Your Seminars and Tutorials: Tips and Strategies for Running Really Effective Small Groups

By Hannah Strawson; Sue Habeshaw et al. | Go to book overview

14 Breaking up the task

Some topics are so big or abstract or complex that groups have difficulty handling them unless the discussion is structured in some way. A simple way of structuring the discussion is to divide the topic into component parts and distribute them among members of the group. For example, students on a social work or community psychiatric nursing course could examine the topic of ageing from the various angles of biology, psychology, sociology, social policy and health education. Or students of history could research separately into different commentators on the industrial revolution.

The component parts can be presented in the form of a list of topic sub-headings, questions, problems, quotations, etc. Students choose one item and work on it singly or in pairs for an agreed length of time. The group then comes together and hears the report on each item. Finally the group has an open discussion on the topic as a whole.

It is important that sufficient time is allowed for piecing the topic together again. Jig-saw, an alternative name for the method, recognises this.

The advantages of this method over open discussion are not only that the topic is covered more fully but also that all students are bound to participate and the standard of their contributions is likely to be higher because they have had time to think.

Incidentally, this method can serve as a model for structuring material in the writing of essays, notes, etc.


See also 13 Breaking up the group.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
53 Interesting Things to Do in Your Seminars and Tutorials: Tips and Strategies for Running Really Effective Small Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Titles in the Series vi
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface to the First Edition ix
  • Chapter 1 - Starting off 1
  • 1- Getting to Know You 3
  • 2- Learning Names 5
  • 3- A Group Agreement 7
  • 4- Ground Rules 9
  • 5- Objectives 11
  • 6- Orientation 13
  • 7- Starting Again 15
  • Chapter 2 - Student-Led Seminars 17
  • 8- Preparing Groups for Seminars 19
  • 9- Briefing Seminar Leaders 21
  • 10- Supporting Seminar Leaders 23
  • 11- Feedback to Seminar Leaders 25
  • 12- Self and Peer Evaluation 27
  • Chapter 3 - Groupwork 29
  • 13- Breaking Up the Group 31
  • 14- Breaking Up the Task 33
  • 15- Sub-Groups 35
  • 16- Line-Up 37
  • 17- Pyramid 39
  • 18- Debate 41
  • 19- Furniture 43
  • 20- Rearranging the Furniture 45
  • Chapter 4 - Encouraging Students to Participate 47
  • 21- Getting Students to Speak 49
  • 22- Rounds 53
  • 23- Gifts 55
  • 24- Students’ Questions 57
  • 25- Students’ Interests 59
  • 26- Thought Shower 61
  • 27- Buzzer 63
  • 28- Open and Closed Questions 65
  • 29- Getting Students to Stop - Speaking 67
  • Chapter 5 - Encouraging Students to Take Responsibility 69
  • 30- Distribute Group Roles 71
  • 31- Working Alone 73
  • 32- Leave the Room 75
  • 33- Carry on without Me 77
  • 34- Self-Help Groups 79
  • 35- A New Teacher 81
  • 36- Group Grades 83
  • Chapter 6 - Evaluating the Work of the Group 85
  • 37- Group Self-Monitoring 87
  • 38- Observers 89
  • 39- Checking It out 91
  • 40- Record Your Tutorial 93
  • 41- Consulting the Group 95
  • Chapter 7 - Written Material 97
  • 42- Display 99
  • 43- Group Charts 101
  • 44- Students’ Notes 103
  • 45- Handouts 105
  • 46- Writing 107
  • 47- Open-Book Tutorials 109
  • 48- Essay Preparation 111
  • 49- Coursework Feedback 113
  • Chapter 8 - Expressing Feelings 115
  • 50- What’s on Top 117
  • 51- Self Disclosure 119
  • 52- Praise and Encouragement 121
  • 53- Concluding 123
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 123

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.