Dot.Bomb Australia: How We Wrangled, Conned and Argie-Bargied Our Way into the New Digital Universe

By Kate Askew | Go to book overview

NINETEEN
Travels in
cyberspace

There were some companies and company executives who gave a little less than their all to their internet forays. Following that line of thinking to its logical end, it was no wonder then that their losses were less than spectacular. Among the executives was Gerry Harvey from Harvey Norman. Harvey’s sensational talent as a salesman was somewhat marred in the realm of the internet by his antiquity. He just couldn’t get his head around how it would make money. So his company built its own websites—which simply directed customers to its many and various retail outlets.

Flight Centre’s hard-nosed Graham ‘Skroo’ Turner also lived up to his nickname in the amount of cash spent on building an internet operation. But he did build a website-sales business which became a vital part of its operations as travel sales moved away from the shopfront to the computer. As it turned out, he had more than the joy of being on the internet—he even got

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Dot.Bomb Australia: How We Wrangled, Conned and Argie-Bargied Our Way into the New Digital Universe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue ix
  • Part One - Pioneers and Visionaries 1
  • One - How We Got Online 3
  • Two - Stayin’ Alive 11
  • Three - At the Edge 19
  • Four - The Real Deal 31
  • Five - Creative Sparks Only 39
  • Six - Peakhour Rush 57
  • Seven - Big Bet 63
  • Eight - Two Bags 75
  • Nine - Australian Pin-Up 91
  • Ten - Reputations That Ring a Bell 107
  • Part Two - Opportunists 117
  • Eleven - Chinese Whispers 119
  • Twelve - Dot.Come Up and See Me Some Time 135
  • Thirteen - Mining the Net 143
  • Fourteen - A Stampede of White-Shoe’d Behemoths 167
  • Fifteen - A Recipe for Success 175
  • Sixteen - Big Fat Media Profits 183
  • Seventeen - New Media Barons 193
  • Eighteen - Shop Mauling 209
  • Nineteen - Travels in Cyberspace 231
  • Twenty - Slow-Moving Scions of the Times 243
  • Part Three - The Morning after 253
  • Twenty-One - The Resilience of Optimists 255
  • Twenty-Two - Never Say Die 273
  • Twenty-Three - A Decade on 289
  • Acknowledgements 297
  • Index 301
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