have no doubt--putting every thing together--that Jane was resolved to receive no kindness from her. She was sorry, very sorry. Her heart was grieved for a state which seemed but the more pitiable from this sort of irritation of spirits, inconsistency of action, and inequality of powers; and it mortified her that she was given so little credit for proper feeling, or esteemed so little worthy as a friend: but she had the consolation of knowing that her intentions were good, and of being able to say to herself, that could Mr. Knightley have been privy to all her attempts of assisting Jane Fairfax, could he even have seen into her heart, he would not, on this occasion, have found any thing to reprove.


CHAPTER X

ONE morning, about ten days after Mrs. Churchill's decease, Emma was called down stairs to Mr. Weston, who 'could not stay five minutes, and wanted particularly to speak with her.' --He met her at the parlour door, and hardly asking her how she did, in the natural key of his voice, sunk it immediately, to say, unheard by her father,

'Can you come to Randall's at any time this morning?-- Do, if it be possible. Mrs. Weston wants to see you. She must see you.'

'Is she unwell?'

'No, no, not at all--only a little agitated. She would have ordered the carriage, and come to you, but she must see you alone, and that you know--(nodding towards her father)-- Humph!--Can you come?'

'Certainly. This moment, if you please. It is impossible to refuse what you ask in such a way. But what can be the matter?--Is she really not ill?'

'Depend upon me--but ask no more questions. You will know it all in time. The most unaccountable business! But hush, hush!'

-355-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS i
  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxix
  • Select Bibliography xxxi
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF JANE AUSTEN xxxvi
  • VOLUME I 3
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 22
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 44
  • Chapter VIII 51
  • Chapter IX 62
  • Chapter X 75
  • Chapter XI 82
  • Chapter XII 88
  • Chapter XIII 97
  • Chapter XIV 105
  • Chapter XV 112
  • Chapter XVI 121
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVIII 129
  • VOLUME II 137
  • Chapter I 137
  • Chapter II 145
  • Chapter III 151
  • Chapter IV 162
  • Chapter V 166
  • Chapter VI 175
  • Chapter VII 184
  • Chapter VIII 190
  • Chapter IX 207
  • Chapter X 216
  • Chapter XI 222
  • Chapter XII 231
  • Chapter XIII 237
  • Chapter XV 252
  • Chapter XVI 260
  • Chapter XVII 269
  • Chapter XVIII 275
  • VOLUME III 283
  • Chapter I 283
  • Chapter II 286
  • Chapter III 299
  • Chapter IV 303
  • Chapter V 309
  • Chapter VI 317
  • Chapter VII 331
  • Chapter VIII 341
  • Chapter IX 348
  • Chapter X 355
  • Chapter XI 364
  • Chapter XII 376
  • Chapter XIII 384
  • Chapter XIV 393
  • Chapter XV 403
  • Chapter XVI 409
  • Chapter XVII 418
  • Chapter XVIII 427
  • Chapter XIX 437
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 441
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