Acknowledgments

Three men are mentioned in the discussions that follow—Dr. Harley P. Brown, Dr. J. Teague Self, and Dr. Leslie A. Stauber. As of September 2003, Dr. Brown is retired from the University of Oklahoma faculty; Drs. Self and Stauber are deceased. These are the people who did the most to shape my career as a biologist, and in appreciation, I would like to devote a few comments to each.

Harley Brown was my major professor for my master’s work at ou. He was a person who lived for his thoughts. He had an immense amount of knowledge at his mental fingertips but felt no need to demonstrate it except when asked. I’ve known few teachers who placed less significance on academic politics than Dr. Brown. His world was that of the invertebrates; Machiavelli did not exist. My first contact with Harley Brown was a moment of good fortune. I had returned to campus after a time in the army, determined to be an ornithologist. I had a degree in math and eleven credits of zoology, including the freshman course. G. M. Sutton, my hero at the time, would not accept me as a graduate student. Dr. Richard Goff, the summer adviser, must have had some kind of special insight; he recommended I take a course called Natural History of the Invertebrates. The textbook was Pennak’s Freshwater Invertebrates of the United States; the instructor was Brown. Before the summer was over, I waded in what seemed like every creek in southeastern Oklahoma. Sixteen years later I met Robert Pennak at the University of Nebraska’s Cedar Point Biological Station and told him of the role his book had played in my initial experience as a graduate student.

-xi-

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On Becoming a Biologist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - Naturalists 1
  • Two - The Practice of Biology 34
  • Three - Teaching and Learning 69
  • Four - Making a Living 93
  • Five - Responsibilities 118
  • Annotated Bibliography and Reading List 145
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