A-Rafting on the Mississip'

By Charles Edward Russell | Go to book overview

Index
Afton, see Effie Afton.
Albany, Illinois, river town; place of settlement of the Hanks family, 80; as a winter harbor for pilots, 245; the “ash-can pilots” of, 245.
Amulet, the, Mississippi packet, caught in the ice in Lake Pepin and rescued by Hanks, 110–111.
Annie Girdon, the, side-wheel raft boat, 157.
Annie Johnston, the, race with Phil Sheridan, 280–281.
Anthony Wayne, the, Minnesota River packet, makes a record with Hanks as pilot, 116.
Bad Axe, battle of, 18.
“Banditti of the Prairies,” the, operations and alleged extent of, 163–170; partly exposed and broken up by Edward Bonney, 164–173; murder Colonel George Davenport, 167.
Bean pot, the, in the lumber camp, 51–52.
Bill Henderson, the, Mississippi packet, origin of its name, 268.
Bill Nye, adventures and observations in a lumber camp, 53–54.
Birch,——, arrested by Edward Bonney for the murder of Miller and Liecey, 170–171; escape, 172.
Blackhawk, Indian chief, career and death, 14–18.
Blackhawk War, origin, 13–17; battle of Stillman’s Run, 17; battle of Bad Axe, 18; end of the war, 18; results in settlement of Mississippi basin, 19.
Black River raftsmen, the terror they inspired, 4–10.
Blakely, Captain Russell, master of the Dr. Franklin No. 2. 120; experience with the Rollingstone colonists, 120–127.
Boiler explosions on early steamboats, a record of, 29; on the Princess, 30–31; on the Geneva, 31; on the James Malbon, 31; on the Lansing, 31.
Bonney, Edward, detective, takes up the Miller and Liecey murders, 164–165; arrests the three Hodges, 165; takes them to Iowa for identification, 166; hanging of Stephen and William Hodges, 166; murder of Col. George Davenport, July 4, 1845, 167; undertakes to run down murderers, 168; encounters Granville Young on the War Eagle, 168–170; learns trail of the assassins, 170; arrests Fox, Birch, John and Aaron Long as the murderers, 170–171; escape of Fox, 171; trial and hanging of John and Aaron Long and Granville Young, 171; escape of Birch, 172; charges against Bonney, 172; the picture on the Lamartine, 172–173.
“Buffalo Gals,” raftsmen’s song, alleged history of, 211; attempt to improve, 217, 219.
Burlington, city of, 213.
Camanche, Iowa, scene of the great cyclone of 1860, 143–144.
“Captain Pluck,” origin of title, 237–238.
Cassville, Wisconsin, decayed city of the upper river, 122–123.

-347-

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