The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII

MOSQUES are plenty, churches are plenty, graveyards are plenty, but morals and whisky are scarce. The Koran does not permit Mohammedans to drink. Their natural instincts do not permit them to be moral. They say the Sultan has eight hundred wives. This almost amounts to bigamy. It makes our cheeks burn with shame to see such a thing permitted here in Turkey. We do not mind it so much in Salt Lake, however.

Circassian and Georgian girls are still sold in Constantinople by their parents, but not publicly. The great slave-marts we have all read so much about— where tender young girls were stripped for inspection, and criticized and discussed just as if they were horses at an agricultural fair—no longer exist. The exhibition and the sales are private now. Stocks are up, just at present, partly because of a brisk demand created by the recent return of the Sultan’s suite from the courts of Europe; partly on account of an unusual abundance of breadstuffs, which leaves holders untortured by hunger and enables them to hold back for high prices; and partly because buyers are too weak to bear the market, while sellers are amply prepared to bull it. Under these circumstances, if the American metropolitan news-

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The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • The Innocents Abroad - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 33
  • Chapter V 44
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 77
  • Chapter VIII 93
  • Chapter IX 100
  • Chapter X 104
  • Chapter XI 119
  • Chapter XII 130
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 149
  • Chapter XV 158
  • Chapter XVI 166
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XVIII 189
  • Chapter XIX 205
  • Chapter XX 216
  • Chapter XXI 233
  • Chapter XXII 246
  • Chapter XXIII 259
  • Chapter XXIV 272
  • Chapter XXV 289
  • Chapter XXVI 297
  • Chapter XXVII 317
  • Chapter XXVIII 332
  • Chapter XXIX 354
  • Chapter XXX 360
  • Chapter XXXI 370
  • Chapter XXXII 389
  • Chapter XXXIII 393
  • A Newspaper Valedictory 398
  • Conclusion 405
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