The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX

WE have got so far East now—a hundred and fifty-five degrees of longitude from San Francisco—that my watch cannot “keep the hang” of the time any more. It has grown discouraged, and stopped. I think it did a wise thing. The difference in time between Sebastopol and the Pacific coast is enormous. When it is six o’clock in the morning here, it is somewhere about week before last in California. We are excusable for getting a little tangled as to time. These distractions and distresses about the time have worried me so much that I was afraid my mind was so much affected that I never would have any appreciation of time again; but when I noticed how handy I was yet about comprehending when it was dinner-time, a blessed tranquillity settled down upon me, and I am tortured with doubts and fears no more.

Odessa is about twenty hours’ run from Sebastopol, and is the most northerly port in the Black Sea. We came here to get coal, principally. The city has a population of one hundred and thirty-three thousand, and is growing faster than any other small city out of America. It is a free port, and is the great grain mart of this particular part of the world. Its roadstead is full of ships. Engineers are at work,

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The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • The Innocents Abroad - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 33
  • Chapter V 44
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 77
  • Chapter VIII 93
  • Chapter IX 100
  • Chapter X 104
  • Chapter XI 119
  • Chapter XII 130
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 149
  • Chapter XV 158
  • Chapter XVI 166
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XVIII 189
  • Chapter XIX 205
  • Chapter XX 216
  • Chapter XXI 233
  • Chapter XXII 246
  • Chapter XXIII 259
  • Chapter XXIV 272
  • Chapter XXV 289
  • Chapter XXVI 297
  • Chapter XXVII 317
  • Chapter XXVIII 332
  • Chapter XXIX 354
  • Chapter XXX 360
  • Chapter XXXI 370
  • Chapter XXXII 389
  • Chapter XXXIII 393
  • A Newspaper Valedictory 398
  • Conclusion 405
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