The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII

WE inquired and learned that the lions of Smyrna consisted of the ruins of the ancient citadel, whose broken and prodigious battlements frown upon the city from a lofty hill just in the edge of the town — the Mount Pagus of Scripture, they call it; the site of that one of the seven apocalyptic churches of Asia which was located here in the first century of the Christian era; and the grave and the place of martyrdom of the venerable Polycarp, who suffered in Smyrna for his religion some eighteen hundred years ago.

We took little donkeys and started. We saw Polycarp’s tomb, and then hurried on.

The “Seven Churches”—thus they abbreviate it—came next on the list. We rode there—about a mile and a half in the sweltering sun—and visited a little Greek church which they said was built upon the ancient site; and we paid a small fee, and the holy attendant gave each of us a little wax candle as a remembrance of the place, and I put mine in my hat and the sun melted it and the grease all ran down the back of my neck; and so now I have not anything left but the wick, and it is a sorry and wilted-looking wick at that.

Several of us argued as well as we could that the

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The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • The Innocents Abroad - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 33
  • Chapter V 44
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 77
  • Chapter VIII 93
  • Chapter IX 100
  • Chapter X 104
  • Chapter XI 119
  • Chapter XII 130
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 149
  • Chapter XV 158
  • Chapter XVI 166
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XVIII 189
  • Chapter XIX 205
  • Chapter XX 216
  • Chapter XXI 233
  • Chapter XXII 246
  • Chapter XXIII 259
  • Chapter XXIV 272
  • Chapter XXV 289
  • Chapter XXVI 297
  • Chapter XXVII 317
  • Chapter XXVIII 332
  • Chapter XXIX 354
  • Chapter XXX 360
  • Chapter XXXI 370
  • Chapter XXXII 389
  • Chapter XXXIII 393
  • A Newspaper Valedictory 398
  • Conclusion 405
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