The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXV

THE narrow cañon in which Nablous, or Shechem, is situated, is under high cultivation, and the soil is exceedingly black and fertile. It is well watered, and its affluent vegetation gains effect by contrast with the barren hills that tower on either side. One of these hills is the ancient Mount of Blessings and the other the Mount of Curses; and wise men who seek for fulfilment of prophecy think they find here a wonder of this kind—to wit, that the Mount of Blessings is strangely fertile and its mate as strangely unproductive. We could not see that there was really much difference between them in this respect, however.

Shechem is distinguished as one of the residences of the patriarch Jacob, and as the seat of those tribes that cut themselves loose from their brethren of Israel and propagated doctrines not in conformity with those of the original Jewish creed. For thousands of years this clan have dwelt in Shechem under strict tabu, and having little commerce or fellowship with their fellow-men of any religion or nationality. For generations they have not numbered more than one or two hundred, but they still adhere to their ancient faith and maintain their ancient rites and ceremonies. Talk of family and old descent ! Princes

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The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents iv
  • The Innocents Abroad - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 33
  • Chapter V 44
  • Chapter VI 62
  • Chapter VII 77
  • Chapter VIII 93
  • Chapter IX 100
  • Chapter X 104
  • Chapter XI 119
  • Chapter XII 130
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 149
  • Chapter XV 158
  • Chapter XVI 166
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XVIII 189
  • Chapter XIX 205
  • Chapter XX 216
  • Chapter XXI 233
  • Chapter XXII 246
  • Chapter XXIII 259
  • Chapter XXIV 272
  • Chapter XXV 289
  • Chapter XXVI 297
  • Chapter XXVII 317
  • Chapter XXVIII 332
  • Chapter XXIX 354
  • Chapter XXX 360
  • Chapter XXXI 370
  • Chapter XXXII 389
  • Chapter XXXIII 393
  • A Newspaper Valedictory 398
  • Conclusion 405
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