News 2.0: Can Journalism Survive the Internet?

By Martin Hirst | Go to book overview

6
Journalism in the age
of YouTube

With more and more people carrying around devices that
capture video—from digital cameras to mobile phones—
YouTube is set to become an essential destination for
watching and sharing these experiences.

Chad Hurley

The launch of YouTube on 28 April 2005 may well be remembered as the singularity event that changed the world, signalling the arrival of convergence culture. Over the last few years the video-sharing website has become part of our everyday life experience. It is perhaps one of the (now many) places in cyberspace that has come to define a generation. Generation Y and the ‘Millennials’ generation (born between 1982 and 2000) are the first groups of ‘indigenous’ social networkers. It was online gaming designer and digital consultant Marc Prensky (2001) who coined the term ‘digital natives’ to describe the generation of teenagers and university students who in many nations have rapidly colonized social networking sites. This term now defines the experience of convergence culture for these demographics. However, it seems that the widely accepted ability of the digital natives to be adept ‘produsers’ (Bruns, 2008) of digital content, beyond their own circles of friends and acquaintances, may well be a myth of the ‘digital sublime’. My own survey of New Zealand journalism students in April 2010 shows that while more that 95 per cent are active ‘Facebookers’, very few are producing and uploading original content for a more general audience (Hirst and

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
News 2.0: Can Journalism Survive the Internet?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.