Long-Term Memory Problems in Children and Adolescents: Assessment, Intervention, and Effective Instruction

By Milton J. Dehn | Go to book overview

4 CHAPTER
Risk Factors for Memory
Impairments

“Sarah,” who had just turned 16, was playing in a spring soccer match when she was accidently kicked in the forehead. Although she did not lose consciousness, she did “see stars” and feel dizzy. Sarah was allowed to remain in the game for a few minutes longer until it was obvious that she was disorganized and off balance. That same afternoon the school’s sports trainer evaluated Sarah and concluded that she had a concussion. She was suffering from dizziness, a severe headache, fatigue, and nausea. Later that evening Sarah went to a hospital emergency room where a brain scan did not reveal any abnormalities, but a doctor advised her to stay home from school and avoid reading and bright overhead lights. At home the next day, she slept all day. Sarah returned to school after two days, but her headaches, fatigue, and bouts of dizziness continued for a few weeks. Sarah was suffering from the effects of mild traumatic brain injury, or what is more commonly referred to as postconcussion syndrome.

During the first week following the concussion, it was apparent to Sarah’s parents that she was having memory problems. Sarah was having difficulty recalling episodic events; for example, she had very little recollection of the game in which she was injured. She also was having difficulty remembering information she studied for school, especially from day-to-day. Moreover, she could not remember some wellknown semantic information and some procedures that she had known prior to the head injury, such as Spanish vocabulary, multiplication procedures, and the combination to her school locker. These performance problems indicated that Sarah was experiencing some mild posttraumatic amnesia. Sarah was frustrated and frightened, but, luckily, the vocabulary and multiplication skills came back after a few days, and Sarah relearned her locker combination. After a week, Sarah was performing normally in her school courses and denied any ongoing memory problems, even though her physical symptoms persisted. However, her parents observed some ongoing memory problems and became concerned enough to take Sarah to a psychologist for memory testing. By the time the memory testing was conducted, a month had elapsed since the injury and the psychologist did not expect to find any evidence of ongoing memory problems. However, the memory assessment revealed

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Long-Term Memory Problems in Children and Adolescents: Assessment, Intervention, and Effective Instruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.