Long-Term Memory Problems in Children and Adolescents: Assessment, Intervention, and Effective Instruction

By Milton J. Dehn | Go to book overview

7 CHAPTER
Interventions for Memory Problems

A high school sophomore, herein referred to as “Harry,” was brought in for assistance with mathematics and study skills. Harry’s scholastic achievement levels had declined after he entered middle school, and he was now performing poorly in about half of his courses. After a cognitive and educational assessment (which did not include long-term memory testing), it was determined that Harry had normal learning aptitudes and average basic skills but deficient academic applications in reading comprehension and math reasoning, as well as poor study skills and organizational habits. Harry’s parents enrolled him in math tutoring and study skills tutoring. Although Harry welcomed the assistance in math, he was resistant to the study skills training, mainly because he believed he knew how to study. When basic memorization methods were addressed, Harry was asked to explain how he memorized material for classroom examinations. Using Spanish vocabulary as an example, he demonstrated how he copied the term and its English definition five times on a sheet a paper. The trainer followed Harry’s demonstration with the comment that this was a basic method of memorization and a good place to start but that there were other memorization strategies that were more efficient and more effective for long-term retention. Harry bristled and stated that this method worked just fine for him and that he had no interest in learning another approach. The trainer subsequently got Harry to agree to an “experiment” in which Harry memorized some random words and recalled them, and then later Harry memorized words grouped by semantic categories and recalled them. Although Harry’s recall nearly doubled with the semantically clustered items, he remained unconvinced. He could see no academic application of this strategy and wasn’t interested. Harry continued his resistance to training in advanced study skills and memory techniques until his parents agreed to let him drop the tutoring.

Harry’s case illustrates several of the challenges involved in attempting to teach memory strategies to students, challenges that are addressed in this chapter. This intervention was doomed from the beginning because of initial steps omitted by the trainer. First, the trainer should have taught Harry about how human memory works and what sorts of techniques enhance its performance. This should have been followed by some goal setting that involved Harry; for instance, Harry should have specified his academic goals and identified types of study skills and memory performance he would like to do better at. Finally, the trainer failed to demonstrate

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Long-Term Memory Problems in Children and Adolescents: Assessment, Intervention, and Effective Instruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.