A Companion to Charles Dickens

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A Companion to Charles Dickens
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Notes on Contributors ix
  • Preface xiv
  • Acknowledgments xvi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Part I - Perspectives on the Life 1
  • 1 - A Sketch of the Life 3
  • 2 - Dickens’s Use of the Autobiographical Fragment 18
  • 3 - "Faithfully Yours, Charles Dickens"- The Epistolary Art of the Inimitable 33
  • 4 - Three Major Biographies 47
  • Part II - Literary/Cultural Contexts 63
  • 5 - The Eighteenth-Century Legacy 65
  • 6 - Dickens and the Gothic 81
  • 7 - Illustrations 97
  • 8 - The Language of Dickens 126
  • 9 - The Novels and Popular Culture 142
  • Part III - English History Contexts 157
  • 10 - Dickens as a Reformer 159
  • 11- Dickens’s Evolution as a Journalist 174
  • 12 - Dickens and Gender 186
  • 13 - Dickens and Technology 199
  • 14 - Dickens and America (1842) 216
  • 15 - Dickens and Government Ineptitude Abroad, 1854–1865 228
  • 16 - Dickens and the Uses of History 240
  • 17 - Dickens and Christianity 255
  • 18 - Dickens and the Law 277
  • Part IV - The Fiction 295
  • 19 - The Pickwick Papers 297
  • 20 - Oliver Twist 308
  • 21 - Nicholas Nickleby 318
  • 22 - The Old Curiosity Shop 328
  • 23 - Barnaby Rudge 338
  • 24 - Martin Chuzzlewit 348
  • 25 - Dombey and Son 358
  • 26 - David Copperfield 369
  • 27 - Bleak House 380
  • 28 - Hard Times 390
  • 29 - Little Dorrit 401
  • 30 - A Tale of Two Cities 412
  • 31 - Great Expectations 422
  • 32 - Our Mutual Friend 433
  • 33 - The Mystery of Edwin Drood 444
  • Part V - Reputation and Influence 453
  • 34 - Dickens and the Literary Culture of the Period 455
  • 35 - Dickens and Criticism 470
  • 36 - Postcolonial Dickens 486
  • Index 501
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