Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology: Global Perspectives on Research and Practice

By Jonathan Houdmont; Stavroula Leka | Go to book overview

4
Employee Burnout and Health:
Current Knowledge and Future Research Paths

Arie Shirom Tel-Aviv University, Israel

The major objective of this chapter is to integrate and summarize what is already known about burnout and certain aspects of physical health. Another objective is to provide a roadmap depicting promising future research directions on employee burnout and health. The major sections of the review focus on burnout and health behaviors, burnout and self-rated health, and burnout and chronic disease. The chronic diseases that I focus on are cardiovascular disease and its major risk factors, diabetes, and musculoskeletal disorders, primarily because there is a significant body of evidence on each of them. In the final section, I suggest several promising future research paths on employee burnout and health. Given the complexity of the burnout construct and the controversy over its operational definition (e.g., Kristensen, Borritz, Villadsen, & Christensen, 2005), I first provide a conceptual analysis of the phenomenon of burnout.

The literature on burnout is now vast; a bibliography covering the period 1990– 2002 (Boudreau & Nakashima, 2002) identified 2,138 distinct items, while a more recent (March 2009) search of Google Scholar—under the key term burnout— yielded more than 260,000 entries. Given the amount of time most adults spend on work-related activities, and the wealth of literature pointing to the pivotal importance of one’s job characteristics to one’s self-identity (Bandura, 2002), the focus on burnout is understandable. A number of comprehensive reviews of various aspects of burnout at work have been published in recent years (e.g., Halbesleben, 2006; Halbesleben & Buckley, 2004; Melamed, Shirom, Toker, Berliner, & Shapira, 2006; Schaufeli & Buunk, 2003). The current review, however, does not overlap with any of these; instead, it attempts to discuss themes and topics that have not yet been systematically reviewed in prior studies.

Burnout is viewed as an affective reaction to ongoing stress whose core content is the gradual depletion over time of individuals’ intrinsic energy resources, including, as the major types of energy resource depletion, emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness (cf. Shirom, 2003). This review

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology: Global Perspectives on Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 376

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.