Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology: Global Perspectives on Research and Practice

By Jonathan Houdmont; Stavroula Leka | Go to book overview

14
Work–Family Positive Spillover:
Where Have We Been and What Lies Ahead?

Kristi L. Zimmerman and Leslie B. Hammer Portland State University, USA

Over the past fifteen years, work–family research has been established as a significant element of the field of occupational health psychology. However, as many researchers have observed, the majority of work–family research has focused solely on the conflict between the work and family domains, ignoring the idea that work and family roles may have beneficial and reciprocal effects on one another (Greenhaus & Parasuraman, 1999). This popular conflict perspective is guided by the scarcity hypothesis (Goode, 1960), which assumes individuals possess a fixed amount of time and human energy and that participation in multiple roles will result in more opportunity for conflict. More recently, there has been a call for research examining the positive effects of combining work and family roles. Ideas about the benefits of combining multiple roles originated in the early work of Sieber (1974) and others (e.g., Marks, 1977; Thoits, 1983), as arguments began to focus on the idea that participating in multiple roles could create energy rather than simply expend energy. Drawing on these early works, work–family researchers have begun to establish a body of research which focuses specifically the benefits of combining the work and family roles (e.g., Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006; Greenhaus & Powell, 2006). With the expansion of this body of literature comes the need for a clarification and organization of the research, which is the overarching goal of the current chapter.

Research in the realm of work–family positive spillover has been evolving and has been focused on several developmental areas. First, research has concentrated on developing various constructs to measure the positive spillover phenomenon (e.g., facilitation, enhancement, enrichment). Second, researchers have voiced a need for theoretical models from which to study the process of work–family positive spillover and have begun to answer this call with the development of a few theories (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006; Wayne, Grzywacz, Carlson, & Kacmar, 2007). Finally, research has started to examine the antecedents and outcomes of positive spillover, with the majority of this research focusing on the outcomes (Stevens, Minnotte, Mannon, & Kiger, 2007).

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology: Global Perspectives on Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 376

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.