They Snooze, You Lose: The Educator's Guide to Successful Presentations

By Lynell Burmark | Go to book overview

2
Creating slides
and handouts

When someone asks me what I do for a living, I respond that I’m a teacher (followed by “I teach teachers to make better presentations.”). People nod, give me a grateful smile, and usually groan about the last boring presentation they had to sit through.

Lately, okay just this afternoon (you can’t rush these things), I’ve been thinking that we are probably even more impatient with sitting through thirty- to sixty-minute, linear, live presentations because we’ve grown used to prerecorded media where we can fast forward through anything we do not find amusing, entertaining, or immediately relevant.


On the web

Internet usability consultant Jakob Nielson warns that you only have about ten seconds to grab visitors’ attention before they click off your site.1 There is no charming presenter alongside to entice viewers to linger, no one to add clarification, change the sequence on the fly, or answer questions as they arise. This does not present a problem for purely entertainment presentations. A video of a cat playing the piano or a prairie dog staring into the camera probably needs no further commentary. For edutainment presentations, however, there needs to be enough information to at least introduce a more serious topic. That information can be delivered as limited text on the screen, as in Jim Bennan’s award-winning slideshow THIRST2 or as recorded voice-over narration, as in middle-school student Darian Coggan’s HyperStudio production, My Name is Cholera.3

-25-

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They Snooze, You Lose: The Educator's Guide to Successful Presentations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Dvd vii
  • Dedication ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • About the Author xvii
  • Part 1 - Evolution 1
  • 1 - Tweaking Presentations 3
  • 2 - Creating Slides and Handouts 25
  • 3 - Celebrating Presenters 43
  • Part 2 - Revolution 59
  • 4 - Ringing Chimes 61
  • 5 - Making Connections 69
  • 6 - Harnessing Humor 93
  • 7 - Starting with Images 109
  • 8 - Playing Music 141
  • 9 - Tapping Emotion 157
  • 10 - Telling Stories 175
  • 11 - Engaging Senses 195
  • Part 3 - Resolution 213
  • 12 - Putting It All Together 215
  • Notes 229
  • Index 249
  • Illustration Credits 259
  • How to Use the Dvd 261
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