The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice

By Chris Higgins | Go to book overview

5
The Hunger Artist:
Pedagogy and the
Paradox of Self-Interest

They pushed the straw around with poles and found the hunger artist in
there. ‘Are you still fasting?’ the supervisor asked. ‘When are you finally
going to stop?’ ‘Forgive me everything’, whispered the hunger artist. Only
the supervisor, who was pressing his ear up against the cage, understood
him. ‘Certainly’, said the supervisor, tapping his forehead with his finger in
order to indicate to the staff the state the hunger artist was in, ‘we forgive
you’. ‘I always wanted you to admire my fasting’, said the hunger artist.
‘But we do admire it’, said the supervisor obligingly. ‘But you shouldn’t
admire it’, said the hunger artist. ‘Well then, we don’t admire it’, said the
supervisor, ‘but why shouldn’t we admire it?’ ‘Because I had to fast. I can’t
do anything else’, said the hunger artist. ‘Just look at you’, said the
supervisor, ‘why can’t you do anything else?’ ‘Because’, said the hunger
artist, lifting his head a little and, with his lips pursed as if for a kiss,
speaking right into the supervisor’s ear so that he wouldn’t miss anything,
‘because I couldn’t find a food which tasted good to me. If I had found that,
believe me, I would not have made a spectacle of myself and would have
eaten to my heart’s content, like you and everyone else.’ Those were his last
words, but in his failing eyes there was still the firm, if no longer proud,
conviction that he was continuing to fast.

‘All right, tidy this up now’, said the supervisor. And they buried the
hunger artist along with the straw. But in his cage they put a young panther.
Even for a person with the dullest mind it was clearly refreshing to see this
wild animal prowling around in this cage, which had been dreary for such a
long time (Franz Kafka, ‘The Hunger Artist’, 1924).

In my opinion, if you really want to know, half the nastiness in the world is
stirred up by people who aren’t using their true egos (J. D. Salinger, Franny
and Zooey
, 1991 [1961])


A BLIND SPOT IN THE EDUCATIONAL IMAGINATION

In Part II, we turn to the practice of teaching to concretise, test, and further develop each of the conclusions of Part I about the relationship between working life and the good life. In this chapter, we pick up the thread of

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.